Issue 98 is out now
Kate Hodges

By Kate Hodges

14th November 2020

Hope shines! Light up the dark, family witchery, magical mushrooms and cheap vegan deliciousness. Plus how Inuits teach their children to control their anger, discover the secret history of charity shops and walk for premature babies.

Kate Hodges

By Kate Hodges

14th November 2020

Kate Hodges

By Kate Hodges

14th November 2020

DO and RECIPE Magical Mushrooms

This year, wild mushrooms seem more abundant than ever. If you’re confident in identifying and picking them, this month will be filled with free and oh-so-delicious dinners. If not, there are mountains of them on greengrocers’ shelves. These ideas from Brit + Co are mouthwatering; Lentil Mushroom Burgers, Mushroom Hummus and Roasted Mushroom and Brie Soup, or go really far out and try making this sweet and earthy Mushroom Cake. If you have any left over, why not dry them to use through the winter or even use them to try mushroom printing.

LEARN and MAKE Let There Be Light
Diwali climaxes on Saturday – expect to hear the crashing and banging of fireworks! The Festival of Light is celebrated by those from the Hindu and Sikh religion. It’s all about the sparkle; candles are placed in homes, there are firework displays. This year, celebrations are more small-scale, of course. Come together and make eco-friendly rangoli, the symmetrical patterns that look complicated, but are as simple as connecting dots. Lamps are a Diwali essential; try making yours from flour dough or clay. As a special, warming treat, indulge in mugs of home-made spicy chai.

DO and RECIPE Life on the Veg
It’s World Vegan Month! Not only is going vegan good for animals, and our bodies, it’s also going to play a vital role in saving our environment. This year the month focuses on budget vegan eats, with a recipe hub (we are SO trying out the Savoury Miso Oats and Jack Monroe’s Nasu Dengaku Buns), cost comparison research, budget tips and practical blogs that are firmly in the real world. Find out more here

EVENT Do It All
The riotously diverse Being Human Festival is a country-wide series of online events run by the School of Advanced Study, University of London, in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy that explores the way the humanities can inspire, and help us understand ourselves and our relationship with a changing world. This year’s theme is ‘New Worlds’, a chance to think about the types of future we’d like to inhabit; perhaps this week we are all a little more optimistic about the coming years. This year enjoy a rummage through the history of charity shops, find out about the weather of the past and future, try your hand at making medieval ink, create your own home museum and learn how to make a digital collage. Free. Until November 22.

DO Night Walks
November 17 is World Prematurity Day – a global movement run by Bliss to raise awareness of premature birth and the devastating impact it can have on families. This year, rather than the usual organised Little Lights walks, which light up the night in support of premature and sick babies and their families, supporters are being encouraged to do their own independent stroll. Grab a lantern, glow stick or candles and head out into the night to raise money and conciousness!

What we’ve been watching this week:

How Inuit Parents Teach Kids To Control Their Anger. “Traditional Inuit parenting is incredibly nurturing and tender. If you took all the parenting styles around the world and ranked them by their gentleness, the Inuit approach would likely rank near the top. (They even have a special kiss for babies, where you put your nose against the cheek and sniff the skin.)

Traditionally, the Inuit saw yelling at a small child as demeaning. It’s as if the adult is having a tantrum; it’s basically stooping to the level of the child.” Read more here

Found something inspirational to read that you’d like to share? Want to share your creations with us? Have an idea for things to do? We’d love to hear from you. Email Kate

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