Issue 104 is out now
Kate Hodges

By Kate Hodges

06th October 2021

Hedgewitch magic with hawthorn, make a corn dolly, hold a cloud in your hands, make your periods eco-friendly, try wildlife photography! Plus free light festival and watch the Wildlife Photographer of the Year awards live!

Kate Hodges

By Kate Hodges

06th October 2021

Kate Hodges

By Kate Hodges

06th October 2021

MAKE NOW YOU’RE STALKING
In traditional pagan culture, it was believed that the spirit of the corn lived in the crop, and the harvest made it homeless. Corn dollies were created every year during harvest time so the spirit had somewhere to live over the winter, and were ploughed into the first furrow of the season; find out more about wheat-weaving here. The woven stalks make your home or front door look autumnal and cosy and are fun to make with children. Celebrate the harvest by making your harvest heart or dolly – traditionally used as love tokens or a badge of trade at hiring fairs or try these designs which are simpler for small hands.
Find our guide to reusable period products here, find out why teens are switching to period pants, washable pads and cups here, find how to save money using reusable products here and learn how to enjoy and honour your period here.

EVENT
BLEEDING GOOD
Environmenstrual Week is a chance to talk about plastic-free periods and to smash a few taboos. Run by the Women’s Environmental Network, the week is an umbrella for events across the country, as well as a spur to direct action. There are events across the country and online, which include a make-your-own-reusable-pad workshop and an online chat about our right to know what’s in our period products. Head here for downloadable guides to unbiased period education, money off codes and templates for letters to retailers and manufacturers of conventional period products asking them to ditch the plastic and craft and events ideas.

EVENT MAGICKAL BERRIES

As all good hedge witches know, this is the season when hawthorn berries start to spangle the trees like shiny rubies. They are magickal little things, said to help regulate heartbeats and high blood pressure. They’re quite pippy and stalky, but it’s worth persevering with the fiddle in order to cook them. Try making richly-flavoured, deep crimson haw ketchup, perfect for eating with roast dinners, or sweet cordial. Find out more about the tree’s powers of magic, fertility and healing here and more ideas for recipes here



EVENT FIND YOUR FUN

IF; Oxford Science + Ideas Festival runs October 9-21. Hundreds of researchers distil their knowledge and passion into a huge series of events they describe as ‘playfully serious’. Some take place in Oxford, but many are online and accessible from anywhere. Choose from a hidden histories tour that uncovers the histories of marginalised communities of Oxford, visit a cloud factory, meet real-life engineers and experts at Explorazone at Oxford’s Town Hall (there’s an hour dedicated for those with ASC on Sunday), or find out about the science of cooking both sweet and savoury food! Download a programme and fascinating free magazine here. Events are Pay What You Decide.

EVENT STRONGER TOGETHERAs the nights start to get darker, so our celebrations become more cosy and magical. See the city of Leeds in a different light – literally – at Light Night Leeds, which runs this Thursday and Friday. The UK’s largest annual arts and light festival bathes the city in large-scale light projections and interactive installations, while music, dance and street performers line the streets. This year, there are ten zones to explore. Watch the Civic Hall being hit by bolts of lightning, visit a giant, futuristic, ‘stone circle’ and meet the most joyful collection of neon balloon dogs complete with bones and poo! Find the whole line-up here

WHAT WE’RE READING Fear on the ward: UK mothers threatened with social services for refusing maternity care​ “Pregnant women and new mothers are being referred to social services by midwives for refusing to follow their advice, patient advocacy groups have warned.

Expectant parents who have declined care, including opting out of scans, refusing inductions or failing to attend antenatal appointments, are among those who have faced threats from healthcare professionals amounting to coercion, according to the Association for Improvements in the Maternity Services (Aims). Read more here

WHAT WE’RE WATCHING The Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition opens next Tuesday with a spectacular awards night, which you can watch being broadcast live for free. Find more videos about the lives of wildlife photographers and a chat with a camera-toting NHM scientist here

loading