Issue 91 is out now
Melissa Corkhill

By Melissa Corkhill

16th November 2010

Last year, Rob Hopkins (pictured) and Tamzin Pinkerton released a book called Local Food, encouraging consumers to find sustenance in their own neighbourhood. Here are their ideas for starting a local food group.

Melissa Corkhill

By Melissa Corkhill

16th November 2010

Melissa Corkhill

By Melissa Corkhill

16th November 2010

FORM A GROUP Look for potential local food supporters try the Transition initiative, environmental groups, food co-ops and box schemes.

IDENTIFY YOUR PROJECT Why do you want to set up a community food project? What areas of local food interest you? What knowledge and resources do you already have between you, i.e. land, skills, tools, gardening experience? List all of these during a group brainstorming session.

FORGE LINKS You can build up an idea of what is happening in your area through chatting with people who run healthfood shops, and farms.

ENLIST HELP A good way of firmly embedding a local food project within a community is by giving others the chance to contribute in some way.

HONOUR ELDERS As we move down the slope away from a peak in oil production, the elder folk in our communities will be a valuable source of ideas, skills and knowledge on how to feed our families.

PROMOTE IT ?Publicise your efforts; make others in your community take notice of what you’re up to.

Fore more information and ideas, check out Local Food by Tamzin Pinkerton and Rob Hopkins, Transition Towns founder.

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