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Right , It has been in the back of my mind that my eldest son now almost 10 could have some sort of mild aspergers.
He has had difficulty making friends whilst in school in the past, but he is now home ed, and he is still a little awkward at being social, although I feel he manages ok, now that he is not having so much enforced socialisation.
He mainly finds it difficult to communicate his needs and feelings effectively, and can be quite overcome by emotions sometimes.
He is also extremely obstinate at times. I can get very frustrated at his total lack of communication at times, and it can be really difficult to get him to speak up. I think that I can usually tell what the problem is before he speaks, so that complicates things as I want him to speak up for himself, as everyone else in the world obviously wont be able to read his mind.
He doesnt have a lack of empathy, and he is very imaginative so I am not sure if it is a mild aspergers syndrome or not.
I do know that he is a highly sensitive child, which he gets from me.
I am wondering if I have been burying my head in the sand and refusing to acknowledge his difficulty in communicating.
Can anyone tell me if a child with aspergers can only have some of the symptoms?
Or is he unlikely to have mild aspergers if he can empathise, and has a great imagination?
Thanks
Radha.

Home edding, non vaccinating, vegetarian, family.
Trust Love Truth Intuition Adventure Harmony smile smile smile

When my sister was small they thought that she might be ASD, perhaps Asperger’s but gladly, she was not, she is however, dyslexic. Nevertheless, the only way that you can truly tell is to have an Ed Psych test and report, really. A great Ed Psych is Martin Turner, google him, he’s still working, he handled my sister’s case and is an excellent professional and a caring man. I hope your son’s situation is worked out and a plan put in place for him soon, I empathise with how this can feel for you, it’s tough but you’ll both make it better soon, I am sure. x

Love and light, Rach. x

Hi Radha

To get a dx of AS they do need to have the ‘triad of impairments’ hmmm  But if he has some of the symptoms then he could get a dx of ‘PDD-NOS’ which is Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (or something LOL!) 

I have found the following websites useful:
http://www.nas.org.uk/aspergers
http://www.tonyattwood.com.au/
http://www.aspergerfoundation.org.uk/

Also, there are loads of ‘tests’ that you can do yourself online, and loads of useful info (IMHO) here:
http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/tests/eyes_test_adult.asp

We had a lot of fun doing all these tests wink

Hope that helps, please PM me if you want to ask anything - we’ve been through many years of being uncertain as to whether to go down the formal diagnosis route and during that time I have picked up quite a bit of info.

Becky
xx

Mummy to four little ones

Oh and just to clarify - I have no idea if he does or doesn’t, but I do think parents know best in the vast majority of cases and if you have that feeling then it’s worth investigating just for your own peace of mind grin

B
xx

Mummy to four little ones

Hmmmm, that sounds a lot like my DD in many ways. I too consider her to be highly sensitive and of course aspects of this (difficulties with sensory processing) does overlap with ASD, which is why it gets confusing!
I have often wondered whether DD is Aspergers…...but like your son she also is empathetic and has a good imagination. A person with an ASD would not have these qualities.
She has social difficulties and I would say she has communication difficulties (more likely to throw herself on the floor screaming than articulate what is wrong!). I happen to think her very particular problem is with EMOTION, other peoples and her own. She has difficulty expressing emotion in a ‘normal’ way and she is greatly affected by emotions of people around her. She feels things VERY strongly. This obviously affects her social interactions.
I found it more helpful to think of high sensitivity as its other name: Sensory Processing Disorder. Google this and see what comes up if you havent already done so. I think its more helpful because high sensitivity gives the impression it is JUST a personality trait and there is actually more to it.
Anyway, Im sure Im not telling you stuff you dont already know, but after all that, I think its useful to ask yourself whether your sons difficulties or unique abilities are having a big negative impact on his life? If so, then that is probably the point at which you may find further investigations helpful.
Good luck! Sarahx

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

Just checked out a couple of websites for you :

http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com
http://www.spdfoundation.net

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

Yamba - 27 April 2010 01:25 PM

..but like your son she also is empathetic and has a good imagination. A person with an ASD would not have these qualities.

It depends on the ASD.  If it was PDD-NOS then they could have either or both.

Becky
xx

Mummy to four little ones

Wow! Lots of info to check out.
When reading up about it I thought that he couldnt have it if he has good empathy and imagination.
I dont want to take him down the formal processing route. My Dh has also said that he doest think getting a label; will help him at all.
Thanks Leikima, I will look up the PDD-NOS thing.
And thanks Yamba, I too think that his main “problem” is emotions and how he processes them and expresses himself.
Thanks ladies.

Home edding, non vaccinating, vegetarian, family.
Trust Love Truth Intuition Adventure Harmony smile smile smile

It depends on the ASD.  If it was PDD-NOS then they could have either or both.

Thats interesting Becky. I have only recently come across PDD-NOS (through the excellent book ‘The Horse Boy’), so thanks for correcting me. I will have to go and google it now.

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

God, dunno about correcting LOL - someone will probably come along and correct me in a minute!  It’s such a minefield!

Becky
xx

Mummy to four little ones

willowwarrior - 27 April 2010 07:03 AM

he is very imaginative so I am not sure if it is a mild aspergers syndrome or not.

Everyone on the spectrum is different. My son has autism and has a fantastic imagination - he writes endless short stories, and they’re very good too, if you like outer-space. :D

Maybe he is just being a boy?

Husband to an amazing wife and learning all the time from twins boys (Dec 2007) and their younger brother (March 2011)

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