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I suppose I am asking to help me clarify my own feelings on the issue.

I have always been very anti private schooling, believing that good education is a right not a priviledge. Myself and my sisters all started in state education, but whilst all 3 of my sisters moved to a private school, I chose to remain in the (state) school system. As a teacher, I feel strongly that I will also only teach in the state system.

Now, with children of my own, I feel more torn. My ideal is to HE, but as my DH continues to be very against this, I have to look into all the options. Steiner is an alternative I could live with I think, but of course its fee paying. We currently cannot afford the fees anyway, but perhaps if we cut back even more and I got a job, we could scrape the money together somehow. In my mind I havent completely closed the door.
I went to a steiner school open day last night, and mostly I thought it was all fantastic. The school is set in the most beautiful countryside too. I came away with mixed feelings though….a part of me felt a bit bitter about the children who do not get this opportunity. Of course Steiner is not everyones cup of tea, but I am also talking more generally of all private schools.

My eldest sister and her husband work around the clock to send their son to a private school. They sacrifice everything. Its not as if they are loaded and money means little to them.

I dont think my children will go to the steiner school, but the possibility is there. maybe the needs of my children are more important than my long held principles? But who am I without my principles?

How do you feel about fee paying schools?

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

Totally agree with you insofar as ALL schools should have the facilities and enthusiasm that some private ones do, but I think often it’s more to do with the head-teacher and the location of the school than the fact that it is state or private.  For example.  I went to a private school when I was between 6-10 years old and it was awful.  Looking back, the educational provision was lousy, with heavy emphasis on country dancing and “being a lady” rather than basic education.  The teachers were snobs and gossiped openly about how rich such-and-such a parent was and of course there was corporal punishment too, which was traumatic, but I’m hoping that wouldn’t be the case ANYWHERE in Britain today.

After that, I went to a lovely, small private school for a couple of years and then to a very large and rough state-run secondary modern, for which I just wasn’t equipped, having only been to private schools previously!

I don’t think you are losing your principles by choosing (it that’s what you decide to do) private education.  Your principles are that each child should have a right to the best education regardless of their background, but if you send your child to a school that you are unhappy about, just because it’s state run, I’m thinking there’s no gain for anybody.

Also, I consider home education to be a type of private education.  I home educate my little brood and I feel very, very lucky that I can afford to do this on DH’s income alone.  It’s certainly not an option for everyone, in fact, in terms of loss of income, it probably costs our family more than if they went to private school because I’m not earning anything. 

It is a sensitive issue and of course your viewpoint changes when you become a parent (doesn’t everything else!) and you can only do the best for your child in your own situation.  Supporting GOOD schools, regardless of their funding, to me, is more important and hopefully shows the politicians and those in charge of the country’s education, what we need for our children.  Will be interested to see what others think.

Home educating Mammy to DD aged 13, DS aged 12, DS aged 10, DD aged 7, DD aged 3 and DS aged 2 weeks!!  grin
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I’m with my parents and, currently, Diane Abbot(!), on this one. Socialism and left leaning principles are merely theoretical idealogies when it comes to the education of my own child. Much as I practice what I preach, I will not compromise on the education of my daughter and being educated myself in both the state private systems, I will plump for the private sector every time. I am strongly socialist and have to reconcile my politics, social and philosophical beliefs with the fact that we do not live in the society which supports my personal credo for living so I must knit together a delicately arranged patchwork of decisions with which to bring up my child so that she may be educated sufficiently broadly to make well thought out choices of her own at a later date. We are going the Steiner route but I understand and agree that it’s not for everyone. However, I don’t think that leading by example exclusively is the right thing to do when the other environmental factors are against you. Sure, you want you child to know your ethos and live ‘right’ by your example but when the aspects that you can’t control, ie the actual teaching, tutor/child relationship, curriculum and governmental interference with targets, tests and league table goals are thrown into the mix, the value in upholding the ethical standpoint of ‘decent education should be available to all’ kind of becomes redundant because you’re then led to compromising the education of your own offspring. It’s a horrendously emotive and tricky topic but if you’re asking for an argument to sway you either way, I’d say, pay if you can and maintain some level of control into the educational input into your child. You can teach them political ethics, your reasoning and personal philosophy later and explain why you did what you did.

Love and light, Rach. x

My only comment is that having had my children at a (steiner) private school for several years - you have higher expectations when you are paying for it.

Yamba we are currently trying to work out how we can afford Steiner too.  I never thought I’d send my kids to a fee paying school but the more I found out about Steiner the more I thought I’ll do whatever it takes to give my kids what I think is the best up bringing.  So that is now my attitude, I’ll do whatever it takes!  However - there is a bursary which you can apply for, and from the parents I spoke to they are more than happy to consider everyones situation individually.  One friend I have made - her and her partner are both artists so some times have money and sometimes don’t - they have a pay-when-you-can agreement and as everyone has to get involved with the school community anyway they are giving all the time
Also, our local Steiner is applying to become funded by the government, I think a lot will follow suit so before too long it may all be that little bit more accesible, only then we may have the problem of them being flooded with applicants and catchment areas being drawn up.
I think so long as the school matches your ethos and values it doesn’t matter if it is private (fee paying) or not.  I want what I believe is best for my kids, some of my friends think I’m mad and just wonder whats wrong with the mainstream, I don’t normally bother getting into it because the few times I have they just haven’t been able to grasp it.

much love X

http://organicfamilylove.blogspot.com/

Some people are always grumbling because roses have thorns. I am
thankful that thorns have roses

Mamma to Zander River nearly 5, Gaia Arwen Sky nearly 3

There’s a steiner school in Canterbury, and I do keep thinking about it, but one of the reasons I’ve chosed to home ed is because I believe kiddys go to school too early - and I’m not sure if a nice environement and a concentration on art makes any difference to my belief that 4 or 5 is too young, and there are some areas I’m not that keen on.. the books I’ve read seem to suggest that if children show an interest in reading and writing before the age when its taught in a Steiner school, they are told they will learn it in such and such class… the idea being this will create anticipation and eagerness…. I do ot really agree with this… now this is what I’ve read from books, I should emphasis that.

So yes I’m torn.  I think if Rye were asking to go to school, then Steiner would be my first choice - if I could afford it.

I’ve just been looking at the Canterbury one and I see they do an in house steiner training course -  I think a nice compromise, for me, would be to enroll on the course, when they offer it again, as there is a lot of waldorf stuff that I really do like and it would be a good way to learn about it more, I think, and could really enhance our Home Ed experience.. and of course, could be that little extra something I can include in my childminding.  Whether there is a call for steiner childminders, would remain to be seen, lol.

Joxy.

https://www.facebook.com/ByHook0rCrook/  - Freeform Crochet Art.

My blog:  http://freelyeducated.blogspot.co.uk/

LETS membership # 52

http://rosehowey.org.uk - HOME!

I think so long as the school matches your ethos and values it doesn’t matter if it is private (fee paying) or not.

I think you are right Gypsyrose. Funny because I had just come to the same conclusion.

Thanks all, interesting views as always.

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

Joxy I think Steiner school doesn’t start until they are actually 6 or even 7 bnecause they support the belief that 4/5 is to young.  There are kindergartens from 3 - 6/7 which are half days but not compulsory and I am thinking would be nicer than maintsream pre-school.
When we went for our visit a couple of parents said to me they had found it very holistic for the whole family, the way they teach and nurture the children is so vastly diferent from what I’ve seen anywhere else. Most of the classrooms were empty because they were making the most of the sunshine and having lessons outside.  And whereas the primary schools round here are the most over crowded in the region the classes at Steiner comprised of maybe 10 - 15 children. They teach in 3 stages they teach the hands, the heart and the head - instead of keystages. It’s really fascinating, if you have time and haven’t already just out of curiosity I’d recommend reading some of their online prospectus. They send more info in the post if you request it.

It’s not everyones cup of tea but I am very impresed with what I’ve learnt/been part of/seen already.  X

http://organicfamilylove.blogspot.com/

Some people are always grumbling because roses have thorns. I am
thankful that thorns have roses

Mamma to Zander River nearly 5, Gaia Arwen Sky nearly 3

It does look lovely and I know a friend has been going to the toddler group and raves about the school and how she’d really love the boys to go - but again has no idea how she’ll pay for it.  (she has twins).

It does sound wonderful, and the Canterbury campus looks beautiful, Oast buildings etc.  Sigh.  It would mean us moving to Canterbury and I would have to re-establish myself as a childminder again - or even look for job that would allow me to pay the school fees - but then be free to pick him up…. it all feels a bit of a pipe dream.  I suppose that is why I’ve been reading up on Waldorf theory myself so I can try and offer a Home Ed experience that is holistic.

Joxy.

https://www.facebook.com/ByHook0rCrook/  - Freeform Crochet Art.

My blog:  http://freelyeducated.blogspot.co.uk/

LETS membership # 52

http://rosehowey.org.uk - HOME!

Yamba - 26 June 2010 08:16 AM

I suppose I am asking to help me clarify my own feelings on the issue.

I have always been very anti private schooling, believing that good education is a right not a priviledge. Myself and my sisters all started in state education, but whilst all 3 of my sisters moved to a private school, I chose to remain in the (state) school system. As a teacher, I feel strongly that I will also only teach in the state system.

Now, with children of my own, I feel more torn. My ideal is to HE, but as my DH continues to be very against this, I have to look into all the options. Steiner is an alternative I could live with I think, but of course its fee paying. We currently cannot afford the fees anyway, but perhaps if we cut back even more and I got a job, we could scrape the money together somehow. In my mind I havent completely closed the door.
I went to a steiner school open day last night, and mostly I thought it was all fantastic. The school is set in the most beautiful countryside too. I came away with mixed feelings though….a part of me felt a bit bitter about the children who do not get this opportunity. Of course Steiner is not everyones cup of tea, but I am also talking more generally of all private schools.

My eldest sister and her husband work around the clock to send their son to a private school. They sacrifice everything. Its not as if they are loaded and money means little to them.

I dont think my children will go to the steiner school, but the possibility is there. maybe the needs of my children are more important than my long held principles? But who am I without my principles?

How do you feel about fee paying schools?

Lisa [size=3][/size] rolleyes

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