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Would you buy Nestle if Nestle were no longer going to profit from it?  Would you buy Nestle if the alternative was that the product would go to waste?

I shop on Approved Foods regularly.  And I don’t buy Nestle.  But sometimes I wonder about it, especially when I’m spending other people money and buying for group activities.  Then I’m supposed to get the best price I can.  My understanding of Approved Food is that they buy excess from supermarket central stores when packaging has changed or they product is about to go out of date.

What would you do?

Regarding products that I boycott, I would buy if the company is not directly benefitting and they were going to go to waste anyway.  As much as I don’t like to see the brand in my cupboard, I would rather it be eaten than binned.

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ummsalam - 14 March 2013 12:15 PM

Regarding products that I boycott, I would buy if the company is not directly benefitting and they were going to go to waste anyway.  As much as I don’t like to see the brand in my cupboard, I would rather it be eaten than binned.

I agree that I would rather see omething be eaten than binned (auming I consider it fit for conumption) although I probably would not buy Nestle items by choice. My MIL ha a habit of getting me Quality Street for birthdays, despite me telling her that I don’t really like them, after giving up on getting her to understand the ethical reasons, but I would rather eat that than no chocolate, and when she buys them, we do eat the ones that we like (the caramel and praline ones lol) then often bin the rest. If we can find someone else who like them though, they will be given away. I have never bought Nestle since I was about 11 and found out about the reasons not to, but since I have had a child, I have become even more vocal (and upset family, as usual) about not having Nestle gifts, as I don’t want to encourage Cerys to like or ask for their products whilst out.
At Christmas, there are always Quality Street at church, and since I have no problem with her eating chocolate, Cerys gets to raid the praline triangles then, but if she really wants them at any other time, she has to have the CoOp ones!

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Good thread. I would buy it. Just as I buy tesco clothes from a charity shop (I usually boycott tesco).

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Starchild, that’s an interesting way of looking at it.  Those have been pre-owned, so you are recycling anyway.  With food that comes via another source which would have binned it anyway, is it the same?  I went to Sports Direct before Christmas.  They had the liquidation stock from JJB.  I know from my Dad’s retail experience that companies will often bin products (including whole shelves of teddy bears!) that haven’t sold well.  I reasoned that the JJB product which were very probably made unethically were no longer being sold by the manufacturing company.  I’m not sure how much I agreed with Sports Direct (who sell products which are probably unethically made too) but they had had the vision to buy products which could have very easily gone into landfill new and unused.

  I remember a thread on here a while ago about someone having Nestle chocolate chips in her cupboard and wondering what to do with them.  Fortunately for me today, the cereal on Approved Foods isn’t what we need for camp!

My other thoughts on this are
1) if you have Nestle products in your cupboard, are you doing low level advertising?  Would you remove the packaging?  Would you explain to visitors?
2)How do you deal with brand aware children?

This is interesting. I don’t buy Nestlé products, however if they are bought for us i would rather use them than waste them, I really hate waste with a passion!
As for the children, I explain that I don’t buy nestle and as I’m the one with the money that’s my choice. At the moment they are too little to understand, but when they are older i will explain exactly why I don’t. Then when they have their own money they can make an informed desicions and decide for themselves. The same principle applies to us bing a vegetarian family there will never be the option of meat in my house, but when they are old enough to make an informed choice they can choose want they want to do outside of our house!

AJ x

I think it was Angie who had the Nestlé butterscotch chips in her pantry grin .  There was a lively discussion at the time.  I still think food waste is one of the worst social problems in the modern world, so yes, I would absolutely buy a Nestlé product if it were going to be binned otherwise.  But I’m also not convinced of the efficacy of most boycotts.  I don’t think the generally useful idea that “every little bit counts” applies to battles against large corporations.  Whereas I think that every little bit of waste avoided really *does* make a difference.

I often shop at these warehouses that get the end of line items and stuff that supermarkets would throw away. And yes, I bought a jar of Nescafe, but decanted it into a fairtrade jar so that no-one would know!

I don’t understand how these shops work.  Surely the money is going back to Nestlé somehow?  The food can’t be donated to Approved Foods can it?  They must pay something for it?

Husband to an amazing wife and learning all the time from twins boys (Dec 2007) and their younger brother (March 2011)

I guess also there is the issue of that you are still selecting nestle over another product which could be thrown away if not bought, if I am reading thje OP correctly?
Also with food bought for a group, you are still promoting the product, if for example someone said ‘Oh, these are nice biscuits, what are they? I will get these next time I go shopping’....
or have I completely misunderstood this???! :0 There is repeat custom which i think is different to buying a tesco dress in a charity shop.
I would also consider that if you have been given the responsibility of spending on behalf of a group you are well within your rigths to make choices based on your ethics and standards.  if you wouldn’t buy for yourself I would say you are totally justified not buying for a group either even if they are cheap.
x

It was me who had the nestle choc chips - they were a gift from America :(  I agree with the last poster - if you are given the resposibility to buy for a group, they are asking you to do so within *your* ethical framework. When I had to buy food for groups at work I told my line manager I couldn’t buy non-free-range meat. I gave him the option of asking another member of the team to do the shopping or accepting my “limitations”. Maybe you could mention it to the rest of the leadership team for your group?

I do also agree that there is a danger of others either a) liking something enough to buy an “undesirable” product or b) being upset that their money has been spent on something they normally boycott (the nestle boycott is one of the biggest). It’s fraught with danger!

On the charity shop front, I will buy any brand from a charity shop, because you are “redeeming” the item - paying money to a good cause to keep the item out of landfill. I won’t buy any brands I wouldn’t buy new from individuals, whether through eBay, Facebook or table top sales, as that is rewardingsomeone for having bought an unethical item in the first place (they effectively pay even less for the item because they get resale money). I would accept those brands if they were freely given to me, but I would make a donation to charity to redeem them.

Angie

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Angiegw - 14 March 2013 11:06 PM

On the charity shop front, I will buy any brand from a charity shop, because you are “redeeming” the item - paying money to a good cause to keep the item out of landfill. I won’t buy any brands I wouldn’t buy new from individuals, whether through eBay, Facebook or table top sales, as that is rewardingsomeone for having bought an unethical item in the first place (they effectively pay even less for the item because they get resale money). I would accept those brands if they were freely given to me, but I would make a donation to charity to redeem them.

Angie

But how do you know they didn’t buy the item from a charity shop, use it gently and sell it on to try to make some pennies to buy more from the charity shop? This is certainly the case here - and if I didn’t sell on resaleable charity items once we’ve finished with them, I wouldn’t be able to cloth my children at all! The same goes for gifts from brands I boycott myself - I give these away if I can possibly afford to but I think it’s a shame to assume that everyone can afford to make these decisions - even buying from a charity shop costs money.

It’s true that not everyone can afford to make these desicions, but if you can afford to then I think it’s a good thing to show preference for more ethical brands. It may be a drop in the ocean, but change has to start somewhere…

AJ x

AllyJ - 15 March 2013 11:52 AM

It’s true that not everyone can afford to make these desicions, but if you can afford to then I think it’s a good thing to show preference for more ethical brands. It may be a drop in the ocean, but change has to start somewhere…

AJ x

I totally agree - and I do so despite not being able to afford much, by buying in charity shops. I was just making the point that actually deciding not to ‘reward’ someone for an unethical choice might in fact be punishing them for making the ethical choice to buy second hand.

I don’t buy Nestle and associated brands, but then much of nestle’s range is processed food, that I don’t buy period.  The chocolate is a bit of an issue, as Rye doesn’t quite understand why I ask him to choose from certain types… I’ve not had chance to date, but I must check out Kraft as they now own Cadbury’s… isn’t Kraft part of or linked to Nestle. 
Clothes wise, I buy from charity shops if I can; but honestly, I rarely find clothes for Rye these days; he’s in 7-8yr old clothes and like I say, rare to find second hand clothes.
I do buy some clothes from supermarkets as I’m a tad restricted where I can buy clothes from for Rye here - it is pretty much the supermarket or Primark - and I just can’t bring myself to purchase primark, no matter how poor I am - and at the moment I’m really poor.

I’m hoping to have some more luck at car boot sales this year.  Thankfully Rye pretty much lives in shorts in the summer; and I guess I need to get the sewing machine out and teach myself how to use it.
I think tho I am sometimes unrealisingly constrained by convention - I do have lots of ideas of upcycling for clothes with crochet ... but keep thinking I can’t for Rye because he’s too old now, I find myself been more conscious of what he’s wearing and not making him stand out like a sore thumb…  and then I kick myself for thinking that way - after all he doesn’t care and I’m keen to give him choice and the confidence and self esteem to be different if he wants and not to be constrained….. but then I see kids snubbing him because he looks different in his bright tops and rainbow trousers, even picking on him..and I wonder am I being fair to him - just because I’m into alternative lifestyle choices….. yet at the same time, my insides curl away at the thought of bog standard jeans and top, or football track suit/shorts… the mini teen fashion for this age… am I making him in my own image rather than supporting his own uniqueness???  Gawd so hard.

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Really interesting. 

On how sites like Approved Food works, this is how I understand it.  Basically a chain mass buys a product.  Product is stored in a central warehouse.  Before some of the product can go to the shops, it a)gets too close to use by date b)the supplying company change the packaging (and packaging is branding and they have to keep it in line with current advertising).  The product can then be either binned (and a far amount of this goes on), donated to charity (and many companies don’t like doing this) or sold onto a company like Approved Food.  It is sold for a very nominal amount.

If I bought something from Approved Food, I wouldn’t be choosing Nestle over an alternative, I’d be choosing the cheapest product. 

I agree that I don’t want to buy something that then encourages others to buy it from another source.  I’ve managed to boycott Nestle for the last 3 years.  I’m hoping I can continue it.  More and more people ask about it.

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