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Hi
We are inneed of a new ‘carpet’ for DD bedroom, but I have heard horrid things about the fumes from carpets being in air for years.  What is the best ‘green’ floor covering for a bedroom do you think?

Wipe-clean wood floor. Or a cheaper wood-style one.

It has been amazing in our living, kitchen, dining room and we have it in my work studio as well. We’re working out how much it would cost to put it into all the bedrooms as well!

Blue-haired crunchy Mama to Ru (5 yrs), Pixie Willow (3 years) and Baby Gaia (7 months).

Check out the new MamaPixie.com

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What sort of floor is underneath the carpet you have there now?

I agree with MamaPixie. Wood flooring is definitely better than most carpets, BUT engineered or laminate wood flooring often have a good amount of chemicals in the form of glues, treatments and finishes. Formaldehyde is one of the most common off-gassing chemicals in that respect. It is possible to get low VOC versions though.

It would be super if you have real wood floorboards underneath the carpet:) They could be sanded down if necessary and treated with non-toxic paint / wax / oil.

Therese

Lino (not vinyl) can be nice.  We have it in our bathroom.  It’s much thicker and warmer than vinyl. 

We have cork on most (soon to be all) our downstairs (kitchen, hallway, living room).  It’s really warm, springy and very insulating.  Brilliant renewable source, easy to clean and didn’t smell when we put it down so assume its fairly gas free!  It’s not tiles but planks with cork/hardboard/cork layers and fits like laminate.  If we have enough left when we do the lounge, we’ll use it in our kids room.

You can get ‘eco’ carpets but I dread to think how much they cost!

akaekb - 12 September 2013 01:18 PM

We have cork on most (soon to be all) our downstairs (kitchen, hallway, living room).  It’s really warm, springy and very insulating.  Brilliant renewable source, easy to clean and didn’t smell when we put it down so assume its fairly gas free!  It’s not tiles but planks with cork/hardboard/cork layers and fits like laminate.

This sounds really nice. Do you know the brand name / type or where you got it from?

smile

Therese

We have these, mostly because this pattern really hides the crumbs!  We love it and have found it so warm!  Really need to get it down in the lounge but small children do take up a lot of time!

http://www.wallsandfloors.co.uk/catrangetiles/natural-cork-tiles/iberian-cork/odysseus-natural-4066/4928/

Thank you:-)
I like the look!
Brings back happy memories from my childhood. My neighbours had that sort of cork pattern on their floors and their house was magical! Full of colourful and curious things they had accumulated while living in India and Africa.

Therese

Unfortunately no lovely wood underneath, just floorboards :(

I googled this last night then got myself all stressed about the laminate we have downstairs after reading about the toxins in that :( sometimes it just feels sooooo overwhelming tryin to be aware of all the nasties out there.

Cork definitely seems the best option…

thansk
xx

Hi, sorry this is a bit late!

Just wanted to say I know exactly how you feel about being surrounded by toxins, but for a bit of reassurance here are some simple things that do help!
In terms of the laminate floor you have it is quite possible that it is no longer off-gassing much.
One really good thing we can do to reduce VOCs in the air (apart from opening windows regularly / having good ventilation systems) is to have certain types of houseplants. There has been some research done on different types of plants and how good they are at removing chemicals from the air. For formaldehyde the best ones are:
Boston Fern, Florist’s mum, Gerbera Daisy, Dwarf date palm, Janet Craig, Bamboo palm, Kimberly queen fern (sorry about the names, they are from an American book).
If you go down the houseplant route just remember to avoid mould growth on the soil (use expanded clay as growing medium or water from below:).

Hope this helps!

Therese

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