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At a HE meet tomorrow I am covering recycling/reusing/reducing & we are focusing on paper. They will be looking at a you tube vid about how paper is made & recycled. We are the going to have a newspaper fashion show in teams.
I want to give them a challenge for the following week: to make something for someone else in the group from reclaimed materials….............but I was also thinking they could be challenged to reduce their household waste for a week. What are some easy things they could look to achieve in a week? Most already recycle the usual stuff, use their own bags and so forth.
How best to get the message across to them about landfill and household waste? Could they maybe chart their waste…...I don’t know, is there something out there already that they can use to help them, a questionnaire to highlight the areas they need to improve as a household….?

A few ideas please! Best ways of getting kids involved so that its really meaningful for them?

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

how about challenging them to find a grocers shop/market stall to buy their fruit and veg from (loose) for a week?

Starring members of the Cast:
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Home educating, thought provoking parenting, healthy eating trying to be locavores- but following our own way

AND finally admitting to having a blog http://owngrown.blogspot.com

Things like fruit and veg are pretty complicated though - there’s a lot more to think about than just where you actually buy it. Do you buy from your local market, but buy fruit that isn’t labelled, so you don’t know where it originated? What about whether it was sprayed? If you buy mangoes for example, you know you are buying flown food - you could support your local trader, or you could buy fairtrade from a multi-national supermarket, and know that the mangoes haven’t been sprayed by someone who hasn’t got access to the proper protective clothing - thereby protecting their fertility, and their children from birth defects. Even if you buy seasonal, on a market stall/greengrocers, it often doesn’t have a label at all, so apples, which the supermarket clearly market and label as English could easily come from Europe or even further away if you buy them on a stall which doesn’t label them.

Encouraging buying from a *Farmer’s* market might be the way to go - ensuring that they are selling only produce from their own farm.

Angie

http://www.etsy.com/shop/WashedUpFamily Sea Glass Jewellery from the beautiful South Coast[/color]

http://washedupfamily.blogspot.co.uk/

http://www.etsy.com/shop/NannieCool , http://nanniecool.yolasite.com Nannie Cool - for beautiful slings, playsilks, toys, nappy wraps and accessories made by Grace’s Nannie. All designs are “Approved by Grace”

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To be honest, getting children involved in “greening” their homes is pretty hard, because most children are fairly disempowered about household decisions. They are not going to get to decide whether to shop at the market or the supermarket, or whether their parents will use energy saving lightbulbs, or put up solar panels. They are not likely to be able to reduce their household waste much, as they don’t get to decide what gets brought into the house. If you want to inspire them, they need to start with an instant “win”, not something that will make them feel powerless over the situation.
The areas they *can* affect are things like being a light/water monitor at home - running round, checking that all the lights are off before leaving the house and no taps have been left running. They could also look at toy/gadget packaging and consider their choices - do they want that plastic toy in tonnes of plastic packaging, or would something else be better? You could also look at teaching skills to assist in being less consumerist - applique or knitting, for example - could they all bring in an old T-shirt that needs revamping or a pair of jeans with a hole, and have a go at giving it a new lease of life, rather than chucking it out? You could do that as a session, ask them to bring two items, and then challenge them to go home and remake someone else’s for them, thinking about their style and tastes.

Angie

http://www.etsy.com/shop/WashedUpFamily Sea Glass Jewellery from the beautiful South Coast[/color]

http://washedupfamily.blogspot.co.uk/

http://www.etsy.com/shop/NannieCool , http://nanniecool.yolasite.com Nannie Cool - for beautiful slings, playsilks, toys, nappy wraps and accessories made by Grace’s Nannie. All designs are “Approved by Grace”

http://bournemouthattachmentparents.blogspot.com/

Good ideas, thanks both of you.

Yes I know what you mean about kids not really having control over household stuff, good ideas for how to make it more meaningful for them Angie.

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

really like the idea of each bringing two items of clothes in:)

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

I run eco evenings for Beaver Scouts (approx 20 children, 6-8yrs) sometimes- we concentrate on teaching them what can be recycled in our local authority recycling scheme.

I have worked for the local authority on this so I have seen for myself how many people (adults) have no idea what should and should not be put in the recycling bin (we have a mixed recycling wheelie bin for certain items like glass, tins, plastic bottles, tetrapaks, paper, card. But can NOT take marg tubs, yog pots, plastic lids, crisp packets etc although people do put these things in and they all have to be filtered out at the sorting plant and then put in landfill). So by training the children they can make a difference (“Dad, that can’t go in the recycling bin!” or “Mum, remember to put that bottles in the recycling!” etc teaching then to clean/rinse out items before putting things in recycling etc. also they take the leaflet home to put up on their fridge.

So we do games where each group of Beavers are given a sack of rubbish (clean!) and they follow the local authority leaflets to sort the rubbish into recycling and landfill, and talk about what rubbish we could avoid creating etc.

This can be extended to relay race- teams run up, pick a piece of rubbish and drop in correct bin, throw in a few obstacles like putting on a hi-vis vest on the way, kind of obstacle race!

Then we’ll finish with a mass junk-modelling session using the rubbish.

How about a plastic challenge. For a week they collect all the plastic that their houshold throws out and at the end of the week talk about how they can reduce it. Then the next week they try to reduce it, again collecting all the plastic waste they have, to see if their efforts have made a difference. It is amazing how difficult it is to get close to zero (especially here with no milk delivery scheme)

Sarah x

Thanks, some really good ideas there! Glad I asked!

To dare is to lose ones footing temporarily, to not dare is to lose oneself.

LETS number 137

https://wildheartseducation.wordpress.com/

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