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DD’s teachers caught me in the yard the other day and has expressed concern that DD is showing signs of ADHD.  Now to be 100% honest this isn’t a massive surprise, we have suspected this for a while, particularly as DD is physically incapable of sitting still, is constantly in a state of excitement and cannot concentrate for more than 30 seconds at a time.  We have an appointment with the GP to see if they agree, and from there I think there is an assessment done?  Not hugely sure, but I’m more concerned about DD being pigeonholed at her young age (6).  I don’t want her to be drugged, and I honestly don’t want her to stop being her happy, energetic free-spirited self.  All want is to know one way or the other so then I can work with her better.

How does anybody else deal with this?  Does diet help?  Exercise?  Supplements? Restricting screen time?

There are so many websites out there with so much conflicting information that my head is spinning!

Mamma to Hannah, age 8 and Jonas, 2

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Rainbowmama - 03 October 2014 09:17 PM

DD’s teachers caught me in the yard the other day and has expressed concern that DD is showing signs of ADHD.  Now to be 100% honest this isn’t a massive surprise, we have suspected this for a while, particularly as DD is physically incapable of sitting still, is constantly in a state of excitement and cannot concentrate for more than 30 seconds at a time.  We have an appointment with the GP to see if they agree, and from there I think there is an assessment done?  Not hugely sure, but I’m more concerned about DD being pigeonholed at her young age (6).  I don’t want her to be drugged, and I honestly don’t want her to stop being her happy, energetic free-spirited self.  All want is to know one way or the other so then I can work with her better.

How does anybody else deal with this?  Does diet help?  Exercise?  Supplements? Restricting screen time?

There are so many websites out there with so much conflicting information that my head is spinning!

This is how my dd has been for most of her life (she’s 12 next week) but she is ONLY like this with us. She is fine at school and can sit and work well and shows no signs of ADHD at all. I’m sure food has something to do with it and definitely tiredness and boredom do (as you know from my previous post). I can’t really help although with the screen time - it actually helps to calm her if she can go on her ipad. When she’s at her worst, going on it really does snap her out of it often (but only if you can convince her to go on it because when she’s at her worst all she wants to do is jump around and push/shove/shout etc etc)

Hope someone else comes along soon to give a bit more advice. x

Edited to add… I’m sorry I have totally confused you with rainbomama!! (without the “w”). You may well not have seen my previous post after all!! x x x

Hiya, I have 2 girls, my little one aged 4 has moderate to high functioning autism, but not adhd. The assessment process will vary from area to area but I expect will be similar.

Express your concerns to GP, together with concerns/examples from school. They may suggest hearing test to rule out any hearing issues preventing her from learning and concentrating. If that comes back ok, an appt with a paediatrician will be suggested. They will probably ask for a speech and language report and also an educational psychologist report. The ed psych and speech therapist can suggest/indicate a diagnosis but it can only be a paediatrician (in my area at least) who can diagnose. Then you will wait for another paed appt.

For us, the speech and ed psych reports have both indicated my dd has asd and we are waiting for another paed appt who will hopefully confirm this.

Life is not like Coronation Street. Appts take a long time and medication, certainly in the UK is seen as a last resort. The ASD and ADHD forums are all complaining about how the story has been portrayed on Corrie.

Many kids with ADHD do well on Equazen or Omega 3 oils, google it! We give it to my dd and although she doesn’t have ADHD it does calm her moods and we have noticed significant improvements in the 9 months she has taken it. Some GP’s and paediatricians will prescribe this on NHS, ours won’t so we use our DLA money towards supplements that help.

My eldest shows some signs of ADHD, however she doesn’t have the frustration and rarely gets upset and she concentrates on what she wants to. She is not overly interested in learning to read but does reluctantly and would happily do gymnastics and PE all day! She is very active and was as a toddler. She is 6 1/2 now (Y2) and her y1 teacher asked us to get her hearing checked cos she would have difficulty focussing at school. They couldn’t work out if she couldn’t hear instruction, didn’t understand it or wasnt bothered about doing it! Her ballet teacher has no problem with getting her to focus and says she is very focussed on ballet so I suppose she is just not overly bothered about school!

Medication tends to be used when the condition is so disabling that it is preventing learning, stopping sleep (as the meds are stimulants they tend to take ritalin/concerta etc in morning and then a sleeping medicine at night to regulate patterns) and having a profound effect on family life x

I do think diet can be used to manage symptoms.

E.g. cutting down on refined sugars and helping keep their blood sugars stable.

Regarding exercise, google Michael Phelps. He has ADHD, was classed as unmanageable at school and was on medication to control symptoms. His family got him swimming to give him an outlet to control his moods and hyperactive behaviour. They discovered he was very good and to compete he had to come off the medication. Because he was training in morning before school, it helped him calm down enough to learn at school, then training again in the evening calmed him down after school. so he controlled it without meds. When he stopped the level of training involved in competitive swimming he was concerned his symptoms would return.

Not suggesting you get your daughter to be an Olympic swimmer but for my eldest, she needs to exercise a lot. Running round in garden on bikes and trampolines all helps. She also does gymnastics, swimming and dancing, all very physical. She is more bouncy when she doesn’t do these things but she doesn’t have the aggression associated with ADHD x

Rose Quartz - 05 October 2014 07:22 PM

I do think diet can be used to manage symptoms.

E.g. cutting down on refined sugars and helping keep their blood sugars stable.

Regarding exercise, google Michael Phelps. He has ADHD, was classed as unmanageable at school and was on medication to control symptoms. His family got him swimming to give him an outlet to control his moods and hyperactive behaviour. They discovered he was very good and to compete he had to come off the medication. Because he was training in morning before school, it helped him calm down enough to learn at school, then training again in the evening calmed him down after school. so he controlled it without meds. When he stopped the level of training involved in competitive swimming he was concerned his symptoms would return.

Not suggesting you get your daughter to be an Olympic swimmer but for my eldest, she needs to exercise a lot. Running round in garden on bikes and trampolines all helps. She also does gymnastics, swimming and dancing, all very physical. She is more bouncy when she doesn’t do these things but she doesn’t have the aggression associated with ADHD x

This is interesting… because my daughter (no diagnosis) has been worse since she’s stopped all her after school sports clubs (she’s moved schools now and only does one netball club a week and she has been better on that day but has generally been worse since she moved schools. I put it more down to tiredness and extra anxiety associated with a new school… but who knows!

Thanks for that.  She had a hearing test at school last year and it came back fine (they had to do it twice though because she kept getting distracted the first time!) There is a boy in her class who has dyspraxia, and it has taken 2 years to get assessed/diagnosed so I am prepared for a long haul!!  (Don’t watch Corrie so can’t comment on that!).  If she was just being like this at home I wouldn’t be concerned but because the teachers are picking up on it as well I think the time has come to have something done.  My parents think we are overreacting, but like I said, we have suspected this for a while. 

I’m trying to limit her exposure to e-numbers at the minute, and get her as much exercise as possible.  She does cheerleading on a Friday after school and she is always calmer after that.  Going to be a learning curve I think!

Mamma to Hannah, age 8 and Jonas, 2

etsy: etsy.com/uk/shop/lazidayz
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lazidayzhandmade

There’s the obvious support that you can put in place to try and reduce symptoms, lots of exercise to help burn off energy, fish oils can help, reducing sugar and going for a plain and simple organic diet as natural as possible. Fidget toys can be useful to keep hands moving whilst they’re trying to concentrate, but medication is often key to opening up access to education if the above don’t reduce the symptoms enough. My son has medication as without it his life is very restricted, it’s difficult to keep him safe because of his impulsiveness, and his access to education was very limited as he just couldn’t concentrate on what he was meant to be doing. Medication can be really helpful in providing support. It’s no different to medicating for diabetes to help a body to function better. You can have medication that lasts for up to 12 hours and wears off for bedtime, or you can have doses for shorter spells and just use it for school time, to enable her the opportunity to learn in a more focused manner to reach her full potential. Often as they get older children with medication can express the difference medication makes to their lives. I wouldn’t just rule it out, it’s finding the best support for her. Their are different brands, some work better than others for different people, so it’s finding the right one.

I would start with supporting her diet, an exercise schedule, and yes too much screen time isn’t good, though we have used crosstrainers, rowers and exercise bikes over the years so he can keep moving whilst watching his favourite programmes. Trampolines are good too. Make sure school are giving her regular opportunities to move around, not just sat at a desk. Children with ADHD can concentrate well if it’s something they’re particularly interested in, helping her find ways of learning that she enjoys is also useful.

Thanks, I guess I have been looking too much into the negatives of medication, they aren’t always portrayed well in the media but I suppose scaremongering is what they do best.  We are having a trip to the GP on Wednesday so we will get the ball rolling either way

Mamma to Hannah, age 8 and Jonas, 2

etsy: etsy.com/uk/shop/lazidayz
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lazidayzhandmade

Hi I have based the last 5-6 years of ours lives on this exact thing, my eldest was diagnoised with ADHD, dyspraxia and ‘some form of Autism’ the doctors said, you can read the full details on what we did etc on my blog http://nakedwildandfree.com/get-started-change-life/#more-647.
My son is 20 now, he has a full time girlfriend he lives with, is really happy and manages his moods himself through meditation.
Please be aware that medication for ADHD has caused many deaths and problems in children. Really research all your options before taking this step. If you need any help with anything or further links, advice etc just let me know. I run workshops on changing lives to be toxin free and would be able to send you a digital copy to help x

Hi Rainbowmama,

My brother was also diagnosed with ADHD and just like your kid he’s still young. We brought him to the ADHD clinic and now he’s taking his medicines and he’s getting better now. Also, I and my mom are reading articles and blogs that give tips about children and ADHD, try to read it maybe it can help you.
Thank you.

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