Issue 89 is out now

Welcome to The Green Parent Forum

A place where you can chat to like-minded parents, form new friendships, share ideas, events and recipes. Use the search tool to find a wealth of information from the past 10 years of forum discussions. Register today and become part of our supportive community.

I know there are loads of foods you are "supposed" to not eat when you're pregnant, but does anyone know what the risks really are? I read something about this when preg with DD which I think divided the risk foods into 3 categories. Something like (a) things you REALLY shouldn't eat, (b) things you PROBABLY shouldn't eat and (c) things you might want to be cautious about. But I can't remember where I read this.

What are the foods where there is a risk of crossing the placenta and harming the foetus? As opposed to just making you ill? Does the quality of the food matter. eg is the risk of salmonella from organic eggs likely to be lower than from cheap and nasty eggs?

Anyone know of any good sources of info (preferably online)?

Is there anyone who takes any of the guidelines with a pinch of salt?

I am trying to conceive, so there are 2 weeks in every 4 where I could be pregnant without knowing it (like now). I was about to have stilton and (homemade) mayonnaise today - both organic - and suddenly wondered whether this was irresponsible. .....well I decded to eat them anyway but it made me think.

Any opinions welcomed…..

Tamsin

I have to say i dont have any real knowledge of facts about these guidelines but I definately took them with a pinch of salt in so much as i ate nuts while i was pregnant and plenty of them! i have read contradictory info which said that eating nuts can actually increase the babys tolerance to them, although dont know how much truth there is in this, however i read on one page of my pregnancy book 'dont eat nuts' and a few pages on it said vegetarians should eat plenty of nuts and seeds! i just went with my own feeling that nuts are good for you and i like them  ;D

( i also remember once eating a lovely big slab of unpasturised brie!  :o this was purely greed and i could not resist it - think thats probably a bit more dodgy!)

Lucy

here is a weblink to a gov. site with their current guidelines might be worth a look ................
http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/agesandstages/pregnancy/whenyrpregnant/#cat226049

Hi
Don't know the true facts either, but with my first pregnancy i did everything "right"- no nuts, no undercooked eggs, nothing unpasturised, no "mouldy" cheese, no shellfish… and she developed eczema shortly after being born. With pregnancy 2 I cheated a lot!- and so far- no allergies at all: coincidence or luck I'll never know!
Gill

[quote author=Squigglepuss link=topic=314.msg3648#msg3648 date=1186760379]


I am trying to conceive, so there are 2 weeks in every 4 where I could be pregnant without knowing it (like now). I was about to have stilton and (homemade) mayonnaise today - both organic - and suddenly wondered whether this was irresponsible. .....well I decded to eat them anyway but it made me think.

Any opinions welcomed…..

Tamsin

With regard to eating things between possible conception and finding out you are pregnant (assuming you test when your period is late and not months later), the fertilised egg is very unlikely to have implanted fully in this time so things you eat shouldn't affect the developiing embryo.  So, no you are not being irresponsible.

Yep, I do take the guidelines with a pinch of salt as they change so often and I tend towards using commonsense and eating cautiously.  I also find that I tend to "go off" certain foods in the first trimester and assume this is because my body is trying to tell me something, so I take heed and listen!

I believe the NCT publish a book called "Safe Foods in Pregnancy" or something similar.  You'd probably get a copy in your library although how up to date it will be I don't know.

D x

It depends on what the item is and what is being risked. Things like unpasteurised cheese and shellfish run the risk of getting food poisoning, which would be damaging to a developing embryo at certain points during the pregnancy. So, if you got food poisoning it could be disastrous but you're no more likely to get it than when eating the item in the usual run of things. Other things, like peanuts, are actually suggested by some sources to be bad for the embryo in themselves, which is different. Although it does depend what source you read. Then there are some things which are definitely known to be high risk for damaging embryos, such as the high vitamin A levels in liver or non-pregnancy vitamin supplements. I guess, as you say, there's 3 levels: definitely avoid, maybe avoid and 'what the hell!'.

Liz grin x

Druid, boat-dwelling, home educating mum of DD1 (11), Aspie DS (9) and baby DD2 (2), & part-time step-mum to 2 stepdaughters, 9 and 7.

I think it's interesting how guidelines as to what is safe varies between countries.  For example in France they say that avoiding nuts increases the risk of allergy, and they wouldn't dream of avoiding unpasteurised cheeses! 

I have to say that I took no notice of the guidelines either- so far we have no allergies, no eczema, no asthma, no intollerances that I am aware of.

‘If we did the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves’  Thomas Edison

http://www.handmadehaven.co.uk  www.shellscrafting.blogspot.com   http://www.myhandmadehaven.blogspot.com

For example in France they say that avoiding nuts increases the risk of allergy, and they wouldn't dream of avoiding unpasteurised cheeses!

There is this, but chatting to a UK based French friend who was pregnant at the same time, she'd looked into it, and said their rates of things going wrong were higher than ours, and their education is trying to get a bit closer to ours on things like the rind cheeses, but the health people have more work to do due to the food culture.

I don't know where she looked I'm afraid, and I definately cheated a bit.  The long weekend in France just before I found out I was pregnant was excess of everything on the banned list I think.  I tried to follow what made sense to me, as the stress of worrying about every little thing it seemed more likely to do harm, than just getting on with making the best baby I could.

My midwife came today for the booking in visit and I asked her about peanuts during pregnancy and she thought that unless there was a history of anyone with a nut allergy in either family, not to worry.  I suppose that could go for anything that was an allergy trigger in the family couldn't it.

Home educating Mammy to DD aged 13, DS aged 12, DS aged 10, DD aged 7, DD aged 3 and DS aged 2 weeks!!  grin
_______________________________________________________
MY ETSY SHOP!
http://www.etsy.com/shop/pipdor?ref=si_shopl

Eggs can be undercooked if they have the lion mark. Something to do with them coming from salmenella (not sure how to spell that, sorry) free chickens and that is the risk of uncooking eggs.

Yes, that makes me worry a bit as I get my eggs from a local free-range smallholder and they don't have any mark on them.  I'll just have to avoid runny yolks or licking cake mix.   :'(

Home educating Mammy to DD aged 13, DS aged 12, DS aged 10, DD aged 7, DD aged 3 and DS aged 2 weeks!!  grin
_______________________________________________________
MY ETSY SHOP!
http://www.etsy.com/shop/pipdor?ref=si_shopl

[quote author=Lilypond link=topic=314.msg3886#msg3886 date=1187190638]
Eggs can be undercooked if they have the lion mark. Something to do with them coming from salmenella (not sure how to spell that, sorry) free chickens and that is the risk of uncooking eggs.

I think it means they have been vaccinated against salmonella so ok as you say.  Of course organic ones will presumably be banned from being vaccinated, so one time when organic might not be best???? (I carried one with the organic ones and cooked them all through in the end - too lazy to go to the supermarket just for eggs).

When I was pregnant with ds1, a woman very rudely came up to me at a wedding reception when I was eating some brie and said ' you do know you shouldn't be eating that?'! I replied, 'Of course I know, I'm a nurse.' and carried on eating.
Sensibly weigh up the scenerios and decide for yourself, moderation is the key. I didn't avoid anything in my second pregnancy, and my eggs are from my own chickens.
annie

I'm with you on that! I've tried to be careful, but just cannot do without runny (ish) poached eggs on Marmite on toast with English mustard.. mmm! - just always made sure they're fresh and happy eggs!

Also have had peanuts, a couple of glasses of vino a week after I got past 12 weeks. Have avoided shellfish when eating out, but have cooked myself when I know they're fresh and cooked well..um..and that's about it!

So far, baby is still kicking so figure it's probably doing OK!  ;D

smile Mummy to DS born March 08 and DD born July 2010 smile

GP Lets No 119

just in case anyone is interested, i found some pasturised brie in morrisons supermarket last week!
I assume this is ok to eat?!?

I have been pretty "good" so far. The biggest question mark has been over parma ham. The FSA website says cold meats have a risk of listeria, but then in the "what to eat when your pregnant" section it recommends a ham sandwich as a good source of protein and carb. Confusing or what? What is the diff between ordinary ham and parma ham? Well my brother was making carbonara and he said the parma ham would be cooked and I really wanted it so I had some, but I don't think it ever got hot enough to count as cooked. Fingers crossed. I read up a bit on listeria and it didn't sound too scary. SOmething like that at could cause miscarriage if left untreated, which implies to me that it can be treated before it is too late.

At my first midwife visit I asked her for a good source of info on foods to avoid and why, and she just knew about the FSA website which frankly is pretty thin on real info. I guess no one really knows.

Share this with friends

Recent Posts